Solid Expressions™ Concrete Instructions and MSDS

Solid Expressions™ Concrete General Instructions

MIXING

Concrete should be mixed by adding the liquid to the powdered concrete. The container should be clean and free of any grease or oil (I use clear plastic glasses so I can see the bottom of the mixture to assure it is mixing thoroughly). Add the liquid a bit at a time and incorporate thoroughly before adding more. The initial mixture will form pea-sized lumps but with the addition of a very small amount of liquid will turn to the consistency of thick yogurt. When you draw a palette knife across the top the concrete should have a wet smooth look. Depending on the type of concrete used, you will have between 5 and 15 minutes of work time. If the mixture begins to harden, it means the catalytic reaction has begun and the addition of more liquid to prolong the pot -life will only serve to lessen the strength of the final product. Pigments may be added at various times in the process, however, usually liquid pigments are added with the mixing liquid and dry pigments are mixed with the dry concrete before the liquid is added.

USES

Filling a form - Any existing form can be filled with the wet concrete, tamped, and allowed to cure. Heating per above is possible; however, it will always take a bit longer to dry as the moisture can only evaporate out the top surface. After the form is filled, any inclusion may be placed in the wet concrete and allowed to remain "cemented" in place. After the hardening begins texture can be carefully introduced on the concrete surface by scratching, brushing, burnishing, etc.
Casting - A simple mold may be formed using raw polymer clay, plaster, silicone, ceramic clay, sand, texture plates, alginates, etc. Concrete may also be cast into existing rigid forms as long as there are no undercuts and a release agent is used (don't use Vaseline or oil as they stain the concrete and hinder the curing process). The wet concrete is troweled into the mold and tamped from below to help air to migrate out from the top. I usually allow 2 days for the curing time before un-molding the concrete. However after a day the mold can be heated very slowly (concrete still in it) at a low (150-175 F) temp in a toaster oven or on a radiator. When removed form the mold there will still be moisture left in the concrete and again it may be placed it a heated environment at a low temp to hasten evaporation.
Covering an armature - Concrete may be applied to a myriad of armatures including wood, plastic, screen, cloth, pierced metal, panty hose and many more. The concrete should be applied in thin coats as evenly as possible. Subsequent coats may be applied to build up a surface however, the under layer should be moistened with liquid (water or additive) before application of new concrete.
Tablets - A tablet or billet can be formed by placing portions of the mixed concrete on a piece of waxed paper or the sticky side of masking tape. The specific shape of the final piece can be drawn on the paper or tape and the concrete mixture "corralled" to fit inside the drawing thus eliminating much of the final shaping after the piece has dried. If tape is used, inclusions may be stuck down (up side down) and the shape drawn around them so that when pealed up the concrete will have the inclusions precisely where you want them. The inclusions will be flush with the surface of the concrete tablet and be free of any concrete. Voids and spaces may be formed by placing any soft material on the tape and making sure it extends higher then the depth of the concrete tablet and retracting it after the curing has occurred.

FINISHING

Concrete formed in any of the above ways may be filed, sanded, ground, buffed and polished. Concrete can be painted with most paints and can also be tinted by sprinkling with pigments (try iron filings or instant coffee). Varnishes, waxes, some finishing oils, and their variations work well but the concrete must be completely dry before application. Mizzy wheels, separating wheels, and diamond burrs work well on the flex shaft and finished pieces may be cut (carefully) on a lapidary saw or sanded on a belt sander.

 

Crackerdog Design

Solid Expressions™ Concrete MSDS

The information provided in this Material Safety Data Sheet has been obtained from source(s) believed to be reliable. Crackerdog Design provides no warranties, express or implied and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information contained herein

MATERIAL OR COMPONENT

Silica Sand* Portland Cement Calcium Sulphate

Vapor Density (AIR = 1) N/A Freezing Point:      N/A

Evaporation Rate (Butyl Acetate = 1)N/A Solubility in Water: Partial

SECTION II - HAZARD INGREDIENTS/IDENTITY INFORMATION CAS# %        HAZARDOUS DATA

OSHA PEL: 10mg/m3 14808-60-720-40         ACGIH TLV: 0.1 mg/m3

65997-65-3 0-10OSHA PEL: 10 mg/m3 ACGIH TLV: 50mmpcf

OSHA PEL: 5mg/M3

OSHA TLV: 5mg/M3 7778-18-9   50-70         ACGIH TLV: 10 mg/M3 TOTAL DUST

Boiling Point N/A Specific Gravity (H2O = 1) N/A Vapor Pressure (mm Hg.) None Appearance and Odor:            Grey Powder, no odor

* The exposure limits are time-weighted average concentrations for an eight-hour workday and a forty-hour workweek. Crystalline silica exists in several forms; the most common which is quartz. If crystalline silica (quartz) is heated to more than 870° C, it can change to a form of Crystalline Silica known as Trydimite, and if crystalline silica is heated to more than 1470° C, it can change to a form of crystalline silica known as Cristobalite. The OSHA PEL for crystalline silica as Trydimite and Cristobalite is one half of the OSHA PEL for crystalline silica (quartz). The current OSHA permissible limit (PEL) for respirable dust containing crystalline silica (quartz) for the construction industry is measured in million of particles per cubic foot (mppcf) and is calculated using the formula in 29CFR* 21926.55 Continued inhalation of dust over a period of years without proper respirator and ventilation controls will cause silicosis and lung cancer. Current OSHA standard for crystalline silica (respirable dust) is 10mg silica per cubic meter of air divided by the percent Si02 averaged over an eight-hour work shift and for total dust is 30mg/m3 divided by the percent Si02 averaged over an eight-hour work shift

SECTION III - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

Flash Point: None Flammable Limits: Sensitivity to Impact: N/A Autoignition Temperature: N/A

Route(s) of Entry: Yes

Hazardous Decomposition Products: Upper N/A  Lower N/A Flammability: None Explosion Data: N/A

SECTION IV – HEALTH HAZARD DATA Inhalation Yes    Skin Yes

Ingestion Yes

Health Hazards (Acute and Chronic) Excessive and/or long term inhalation may cause silicosis and/or lung disease. Short Term exposure may cause irritation to nose, throat, and respiratory passages.

Symptoms of Exposure: Exposure to skin may cause rash and redness. Inhalation may cause coughing, shortness of breath, wheezing and pulmonary disorders.

Emergency First Aid:          Inhalation: Seek medical attention and remove person to fresh air.

Skin: Wash with soap and water  Eyes: Flush with copious amounts of clean water for fifteen minutes

Ingestion: immediately seek medical advise. Give milk or egg white beaten with water until vomit fluid is clear. If vomiting does not occur, induce vomiting by gagging the victim (by placing a finer at the back of the throat) DO NOT INDUCE VOMITING OR GIVE ANYTHING BY MOUTH TO AN UNCONSCIOUS PERSON

Carcinogen: Yes

The exposure limits are time-weighted average concentrations for an eight-hour workday and a forty-hour workweek. Crystalline silica exists in several forms; the most common which is quartz. If crystalline silica (quartz) is heated to more than 870° C, it can change to a form of Crystalline Silica known as Trydimite, and if Crystalline Silica is heated to more than 1470° C, it can change to a form of crystalline silica known as Cristobalite. The OSHA PEL for crystalline silica as Trydimite and Cristobalite is one half of the OSHA PEL for crystalline silica (quartz). The current OSHA permissible limit (PEL) for respirable dust containing crystalline silica (quartz) for the construction industry is measured in million of particles per cubic foot (mppcf) and is calculated using the formula in 29CFR* 21926.55 Continued inhalation of dust over a period of years without proper respirator and ventilation controls will cause silicosis and lung cancer. Current OSHA standard for crystalline silica (respirable dust) is 10mg silica per cubic meter of air divided by the percent Si02 averaged over an eight-hour work shift and for total dust is 30mg/m3 divided by the percent Si02 averaged over an eight-hour work shift

SECTION V – EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID PROCEDURES

Emergency and First Aid Procedures:

Eyes: Immediately flush affected eye/eyes with copious amounts of clean water for at least 15 minutes. If irritation persists, seek immediate medical attention.

Skin: Contact with skin may cause irritation and/or rash. Always wash exposed areas twice with soap and water. If irritation continues, seek medical attention. Product is alkaline and will cause burns if not thoroughly rinsed from affected area.

Ingestion: Immediately seek medical attention. Give milk or egg whites mixed with water until vomit is clear. If vomiting does not occur, induce by gagging the victim by placing a clean gloved finger at the back of the throat      NEVER INDUCE VOMITING TO AN UNCONSCIOUS PERSON.

SECTION VI – REACTIVITY DATA

Conditions Known to Cause Instability: Product is stable      Hazardous Decomposition: N/A

Incompatibility/Materials to avoid: Product is incompatible with organic and inorganic acids. Acid will react with cement and carbonates.

SECTION VII – SPECIAL PROTECTION INFORMATION

Personal Protection Equipment: Safety glasses, neoprene gloves, protective clothing and a respirator is recommended.

Gloves: Rubber  Respirator: A NIOSH approved particulate mask is recommended.        Footwear: N/A

Eyes: Safety glasses. A face shield may not protect air born dusts from entering the eyes.Clothing: Normal work clothes.

Handling Procedures and Equipment: Avoid direct and prolonged exposure to eyes and skin. Always wash after use.

Engineering Controls: Normal mechanical ventilation and exhaust are preferred. 

SECTION VIII – SPILL, LEAK AND DISPOSAL

Storage Requirements: Material is very stable in its un-opened bag. Repair any broken or torn bags immediately. Store in a dry, cool area.

Spill and Leak Disposal: Vacuum any spills with a HEPA type vacuum cleaner. Avoid creating dusts. Do not wash down any drains or sewer lines as it may solidify and harden in the drain.

Waste Disposal: Dispose as a non-hazardous waste, in compliance with local, state and federal regulations. To contain any dusts, water down the empty bags with water to harden the material in a solid waste

 

Crackerdog Design

Solid Expressions™ Concrete Disclaimer

As always, when working with any material, we need some basic facts and to use common sense. So, there are a few guidelines we recommend you follow when working with concrete. It is advisable to use a simple nuisance mask when working with your concrete. If these masks are a nuisance to you by fogging up your glasses (like me) you can simply tie a bandana around your nose and mouth.

Of course, don’t breath in excess amounts of the dust, wash your hands thoroughly after handling and mixing, use disposable mixing cups and sticks. Let the excess dry in the disposable container, and do NOT rinse it down the drain! By all means discourage yourself from sprinkling it on your oatmeal in the morning. We all want a breakfast that sticks with us, but a bit of protein is more effective than concrete!